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Why are business awards so important?

Due to our latest success with becoming nominees and winners of varied business awards, we thought we would get the opinion of one of our interviewers for Thames Valley Tech Awards, Nicky Larkin, of Goringe Accounts on why business awards are of great significance.

Why do you feel business awards are important to the business community?

Business awards are important as they give businesses huge recognition for the fantastic results they’ve achieved and the work they’ve done, making them stand out from the competition. This is not only great for attracting new customers but gaining strong recognition for success inspires and motivates your team, can help to attract top talent and is great for PR, marketing and brand reputation.

Why did you chose to sponsor the TVT awards?

The TV technology awards are well established and highly recognized for being one of the most credible awards in the region and do an extremely good job at pulling together a successful awards process and event.

The reason we chose to sponsor the Tech Leadership Team category was because technology is a sector we heavily specialize in, in providing finance services from VAT to Payroll to R&D Tax relief. By sponsoring the TVT awards and in particular our category, we’re giving the opportunity for the best technology companies and their leadership, to shine as the best in the region and, arguably the best in the country as the Thames Valley is deemed the tech hub of the UK.

What are you looking for in a good award submission?

An entry that shows outstanding achievement and, for our category, world class team leadership who were truly innovative and successful in their work.

Do you enter any business awards yourself?

We’ve proudly won awards such as ‘The Thames Valley Small Employer of the Year,’ at the National Apprenticeship Awards, listed as a Top 10 firm in the Accountancy Practice Excellence Award, and in 2017 I received the ‘Professional of The Year ‘Award at the NatWest Thames Valley Venus Awards.

Entering awards does take time and resource but should be an essential part of any business’s growth strategy so we aim to enter awards every other year.

What would your advice be to someone thinking of entering their first awards?

Coming back to my point about the time and effort it can take to enter awards, ensure that you focus on awards where you have the strongest evidence of success.

Don’t be scared to enter awards and when you find the right one for your business, then go for it. Read the entry criteria and judging guidelines thoroughly and carefully, and ensure to provide high quality information and evidence that’s relevant to the category – don’t be tempted to just rehash from previous award entries. Show how you are different and a worthy winner of that particular category.

If you would like to get in touch with Nicky personally in regards to Goringe Accounts, their website is hyperlinked, or you can follow Nicky’s twitter account at @GoringeAccounts.

 

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Windows RT is dead – and that’s good for freedom

Windows RT – the cut-down, half-fat, limited, unloved version of the world’s most famous operating system – is officially dead. Microsoft tweeted us to confirm:

That it was in terminal decline is of no surprise to anyone, though manufacturers do like to string these things out. It quickly became apparent that people weren’t going to buy RT unless there were apps for it, and developers weren’t going to write apps for it unless people started buying it. Ultimately neither side broke the cycle. It’s perhaps telling that in the entire history of Apps In The Sky, we’ve never once been asked to create an app for Windows RT.

The death of RT is a victory – perhaps incidentally, but a victory nonetheless – for freedom. RT represented Microsoft’s first forays into closed-system computing. That is, RT was intentionally locked down so that it could only run software that had been pre-approved, screened and censored by Microsoft. This set a potentially dangerous precedent, because it gave a single commercial organisation the complete power of veto over everything you might want to do with your computer. If you wanted an RT app we would have had to first check against Microsoft’s rules that what you wanted was OK by them, even if you were the only person who was going to use it.

The technology also had the potential to permit more sinister, draconian policies. What if Microsoft started rejecting apps which were beneficial to consumers, but against their own commercial interests? There would be nothing you could do, for example, if they one day banned Chrome/Firefox and forced everyone to use Internet Explorer.
That consumers have overwhelmingly voted against it, even where not for this reason, is an important step. We hope Microsoft will learn from this experience. Don’t believe the haters: Windows is a truly great operating system, and Windows 10 in particular looks superb. We hope it will forever maintain its openness and the right of the consumer to choose what they want to do with their computer. The future is surely bright.